This is page 680 of An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary by Bosworth and Toller (1898)

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MERE-CIST - MERSC-WARE

mere-cist, e; f. A sea-chest :-- Noe ongan wyrcan micle merecieste (the ark), Cd. 66; Th. 79, 26; Gen. 1317.

mere-deáþ, es; m. Death in the sea, death by drowning, Cd. 169 ; Th. 210, 9; Exod. 512. Meredeáþa mæ-acute;st (the destruction of the Egyptians in the Red Sea), 166; Th. 207, 9; Exod. 464.

mere-deór, es; n. A sea-beast, Beo. Th. 1120; B. 558. [O. L. Ger. meri-dier a water fowl: O. H. Ger. meri-tier.]

mere-fara, an; m. A sea-farer, Beo. Th. 1008; B. 502.

mere-faroþ, es; m. Sea-waves :-- On merefaroþe on the waves, Andr. Kmbl. 577; An. 289: 701; An. 351: Exon. 122 b; Th. 471, 16; Rä. 61, 2.

mere-fisc, es; m. A sea-fish :-- Wæs merefixa mód onhréred, Beo. Th. 1102; B. 549. [O. H. Ger. mere-uisc piscis maris.]

mere-flód, es; m. I. a flood of water, deluge :-- Mereflód diluvium, Exon. 56 b; Th. 200, 18; Ph. 42: Cd. 67; Th. 81, 7; Gen. 1341. Streám fleów ofer foldan ... miclade mereflód, Andr. Kmbl. 3050; An. 1528. II. a body of water, flood, ocean :-- Mereflódes ýþa, Bt. Met. Fox 27, 4; Met. 27, 2: Cd. 167; Th. 209, 23; Exod. 503. On mereflóde middum in the midst of the waters, 8; Th. 9, 21; Gen. 145. Bisencte on mereflóde drowned in ocean, Exon. 72 b; Th. 271, 10; Jul. 480: 82 a; Th. 309, 19; Seef. 59.

mere-grot, es; n. A pebble or stone of the sea, a pearl :-- Ne forlæ-acute;te ic ðé næ-acute;fre, mín meregrot! Blickl. Homl. 149, 2. Is heofena ríce gelíc ðam mangere ðe sóhte ðæt góde meregrot. Ðá hé funde ðæt án deórwyrðe meregrot ðá bohte hé ðæt meregrot, Mt. Kmbl. 13, 45-46. Bergean swylce meregrota (margaritæ), Nar. 37, 29. Gefrætwod swá swá mid meregrotum, Homl. Th. i. 596, 8. [Cf. O. H. Ger. meri-grioz margarita, unio.] v. next word.

mere-grota, an; m. A pearl :-- Meregrota margarita, Wrt. Voc. i. 85, 24. On ðám beóþ oft gemétte ða betstan meregrotan quibus inclusam sæpe margaritam optimam inveniunt, Bd. 1, 1; S. 473, 18. [Cf. O. Sax. meri-grita, -griota.]

mere-grund, es; m. The bottom of a sea or lake, Beo. Th. 2902; B. 1449: 4207; B. 2100.

mere-hengest, es; m. A sea-steed, a ship, Exon. 104 a; Th. 395, 12; Rä. 15, 6: Bt. Met. Fox 26, 49; Met. 26, 25.

mere-hrægel, es; n. A sea-garment, a sail :-- Merehrægla sum, segl sále fæst, Beo. Th. 3815; B. 1905.

mere-hús, es; n. A sea-house (Noah's ark), Cd. 65; Th. 78, 34; Gen. 1303: 69; Th. 82, 18; Gen. 1364.

mere-hwearf, es; m. A sea-wharf, sea-shore, Cd. 169; Th. 210, 16; Exod. 516.

mére-hwít. v. mæ-acute;re pure.

mere-lád, e; f. A sea-way, the road which the sea furnishes, Exon. 123 b; Th. 474, 9; Bo. 27.

mere-líðende sea-faring, a sea-faring person, Cd. 71; Th. 84, 34; Gen. 1407: Beo. Th. 515; B. 255: Andr. Kmbl. 705; An. 353. [Cf. Icel. mar-líðendr; pl. sea-farers.]

mere-men[n], e; f. A siren :-- Meremen sirena, Wrt. Voc. i. 289, 6. Meremenna sirenarum, Hpt. Gl. 498, 65. [Brutus iherde siggen þurh his sæmonnen of þan ufele ginnen þe cuðen þa mereminnen, Laym. 1337: O. H. Ger. mer-min siren; meri-meni, -menni scylla.] v. next word and Grmm. D. M. 404-407.

mere-menen, -mennen, e; f. A siren :-- Meremenin sirina, Wülck. 47, 7. Meremennena sirenarum, Wrt. Voc. i. 84, 12. [Cf. Icel. mar-mennill; m. a sea-goblin.] Cf. mere-wíf.

mere-næddra, an; m. -nædre, an; f. A sea-adder, a lamprey :-- Merenæddra murena vel murina vel lampreda, Wrt. Voc. i. 55, 65. Myre-næddra, 77, 72. Merenædre, ii. 59, 23.

mere-smylte; adj. Having the sea calm :-- Meresmylta wíc, Bt. Met. Fox 21, 24; Met. 21, 12.

mere-stræ-acute;t, e; f. The road which the sea furnishes, Elen. Kmbl. 483; El. 242: Beo. Th. 1032; B. 514.

mere-streám, es; m. A sea-stream, the sea, water of the sea, Cd. 39; Th. 51, 27; Gen. 833: 154; Th. 191, 5; Exod. 210: 166; Th. 207, 17; Exod. 468. Merestreám ne dear ofer eorþan sceát eard gebræ-acute;dan (cf. sæ-acute;, Bt. Fox 74, 26), Bt. Met. Fox 11, 130; Met. 11, 65: 20, 228; Met. 20, 114. Óþ merestreámas unto the waters of the sea, Cd. 199; Th. 247, 27; Dan. 503: Bt. Met. Fox 28, 65; Met. 28, 33. Manegum merestreámum de aquis multis, Ps. Th. 143, 12. [O. Sax. meri-stróm.]

mere-strengu; f. Strength in the sea, strength for swimming :-- Ic merestrengo máran áhte, earfeþo on ýðum, ðonne æ-acute;nig óðer man, Beo. Th. 1070; B. 533.

mere-swín, es; n. A sea-pig, porpoise, dolphin :-- Ðes mereswín hic delfin, Ælfc. Gr. 9, 14; Som. 9, 37: Wrt. Voc. ii. 26, 15: i. 281, 56. Mereswín bacharus, 281, 57: 65, 61: delphin vel bocharius vel simones, 55, 60. Mereswýn bacharus, 21, 46. Meresuín bacanius, ii. 102, 11. Æ-acute;lc seldfynde fisc ðe weorðlíc byþ, styria and mereswýn, Cod. Dip. Kmbl. iii. 450, 28. Nim mereswínes fel, L. M. 3, 40; Lchdm. ii. 334, 1. Mereswýn and stirian delphinos et sturias, Coll. Monast. Th. 24, 9: Bd. 1, 1; S. 473, 17. [Icel. mar-swín: O. H. Ger. meri-suín: Ger. meerschwein dolphin, porpoise.]

mere-þyssa, an; m. A sea-rusher, a ship :-- On mereþyssan, Andr. Kmbl. 892; An. 446. On mereþissan, 514; An. 257. [Cf. Icel. þysja to rush; þyss uproar.]

mere-torht; adj. Bright from bathing in the sea (epithet of morning) :-- Sió sunne brencþ eorþwarum morgen meretorhtne the sun rising from the sea brings bright morn to men, Bt. Met. Fox 13, 121; Met. 13, 61. Becwom ofer gársecges [begong] morgen mæretorht [or mæ-acute;retorht splendidly bright, cf. O. H. Ger. mári-mihil], Cd. 160; Th. 199, 29; Exod. 346. Cf. mere-candel.

mere-torr, es; m. A tower formed by the sea (the walls formed by the waters of the Red Sea), Cd. 167; Th. 208, 16; Exod. 484.

mere-weard, es; m. A sea-ward, one who keeps guard in the sea :-- Se mereweard (the whale), Exon. 97 a; Th. 363, 13; Wal. 53.

mere-wérig; adj. Weary of journeying on the sea :-- Merewérges mód the mind of the sea-weary man, Exon. 81 b; Th. 306, 23; Seef. 12.

mere-wíf, es; n. A water-witch, woman living in a lake (Grendel's mother), Beo. Th. 3042; B. 1519. [O. H. Ger. meri-wíb sirena.]

mergen. v. merigen.

merian; p. ede; pp. ed To purify, refine :-- Ðam ðe his gást wile mergan (MS. B. merian) of sorge ásceádan of scyldum for him who will purify his spirit from the dross of care, separate it from guilt, Salm. Kmbl. 112; Sal. 55. v. á-merian.

merig. v. mirig.

merigen, merien, mergen, es; m. I. morning :-- Úres andgites merigen is úre cildhád, Homl. Th. ii. 76, 14. Ðá se mergen geworden wæs when it was morning, St. And. 10, 3. Mergen þridda, Cd. 8; Th. 10, 11; Gen. 155: Beo. Th. 4213; B. 2103: 4255; B. 2124. Merien mane, Wrt. Voc. i. 76, 53. On mergenne mane, Ps. Spl. 91, 2: Ps. Th. 54, 17: 89, 16: Beo. Th. 1134; B. 565. In merne mane, Mt. Kmbl. Lind. 20, 1: 21, 18. Tó merne, 16, 3. On ðam dæge worhte God merigen and æ-acute;fen, Homl. Th. i. 100, 5. On mergen mane, Ps. Spl. 89, 6. II. the morning of the next day, morrow :-- Ðú ðe nást hwæðer ðú merigenes gebíde thou that knowest not whether thou wilt live to see the morrow, Homl. Th. ii. 104, 26. Hwæt gif ic bíde merigenes, Homl. Skt. 3, 585. In merne in crastinum, Mt. Kmbl. Lind. 6, 34. On merne, Jn. Skt. Lind. 1, 43: 12, 12. Tó merne cras, Lk. Skt. Lind. 13, 32. On mergen in crastinum, Jn. Skt. 1, 43: 12, 12. On merien, Homl. Th. ii. 502, 16. Wé nyton hwæt tó merigen biþ tóweard, 82, 17: i. 374, 21: 462, 3. Tó merigen cras, Ælfc.Gr. 38; Som. 39, 59. v. æ-acute;r-, æ-acute;rne-mergen, and morgen.

merigen-, mergen-dæg, es; m. Morrow :-- Hé ðæs mergendæges gebídan móste, Blickl. Homl. 213, 25. v. morgen-dæg.

merigen-, mergen-líc; adj. I. belonging to the morning :-- Se merigenlíca tilia the labourer who came to work in the morning, Homl. Th. ii. 74, 29, Se mergenlíca steorra the morning star, Blickl. Homl. 137, 32. II. belonging to the morrow :-- Ðam ne fyligþ merigenlíc dæg, forðan ðe him ne forstóp se gysternlíca, Homl. Th. i. 490, 19. Ðýs mergenlícan dæge, Blickl. Homl. 143, 21: 147, 29. v. morgen-líc.

merigen-, mergen-tíd, e; f. Morning-time, morning :-- Fram ðære mæ-acute;ran mergentíde óþ ðæt æ-acute;fen cume a custodia matutina usque ad noctem, Ps. Th. 129, 6. v. morgen-tíd.

merisc. v. mersc.

merne. v. merigen.

merra, merran, merring. v. mirra, mirran, mirring.

mersc, es; m. A marsh :-- Mersc calmetum, Wrt. Voc. ii. 13, 42: 103, 10: 127, 55. Tó mærsce, Cod. Dip. Kmbl. iii. 175, 32. Ðat lond at Ðorpe mid médwe and mid merisce, iv. 295, 7. On sealtum mersce, Ps. Spl. 106, 34. Hé ða weaxendan wende eorþan on sealtne mersc (in salsuginem), Ps. Th. 106, 33: Blickl. Gl.: Cd. 160; Th. 199, 4; Exod. 333. Ne fersc ne mersc, Lchdm. iii. 286, 21. Sumra wyrta eard biþ on merscum alias herbas ferunt paludes, Bt. 34, 10; Fox 148, 23. On feldum and on mæ-acute;dum and on sealtum merscum, Cod. Dip. Kmbl. iii. 350, 8. Mersc Romney Marsh, Chr. 796; Erl. 58, 11.

mersc-land, es; n. Marsh-land :-- Forneáh æ-acute;lc tilþ on mersclande forférde, Chr. 1098; Erl. 235, 12.

mersc-mealwe, an; f. Marsh-mallow :-- Merscmealewe althea, Wrt. Voc. i. 67, 20. Merscmealwe hibiscum, ii. 43, 3. Merscmealuwe. Ðeós wyrt ðe man hibiscum and óðrum naman merscmealwe (-mealuwe, MS. B.) nemnaþ, Herb. 39; Lchdm. i. 140, 3-5. Merscmealwan crop, L. M. 3, 63; Lchdm. ii. 350, 24. Nim merscmealwan, 3, 8; Lchdm. ii. 312, 12.

mersc-mear-gealla, an; m. A kind of gentian; gentiana pneumonanthe :-- Nim merscmeargeallan, L. M. 1, 39; Lchdm. ii. 100, 5: 1, 50; Lchdm. ii. 124, 1.

Mersc-ware; pl. The inhabitants of marshy land :-- Myrcena cining oferhergode Cantware and Merscware (men of RomneyMarsh), Chr, 796; Erl. 59, 40. Monige on Merscwarum many of the men of the fens, 838; Erl. 66, 12.