This is page 85 of An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary by Bosworth and Toller (1898)

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BEÓ-MÓDER - BEORG-HLEOÞ

beó-móder; f. A BEE-MOTHER, queen-bee; chosdrus? vel castros? Ælfc. Gl. 22; Som. 59, 104; Wrt. Voc. 23, 61.

BEÓN [bión], to beónne; part. beónde; ic beó [beóm], ðú bist, byst, he biþ, byþ, pl. beóþ; impert. beó, pl. beóþ; subj. beó, pl. beón To BE, exist, become; esse, fieri :-- Hí ne tweódon férende beón to ðam écan lífe non dubitabant esse transituros ad vitam perpetuam, Bd. 4, 16; S. 584, 38, 18. Ðe ðæ-acute;r beón noldon who would not be there, Byrht. Th. 137, 13; By. 185 : Exon. 100 a; Th. 376, 29; Seel. 162 : Cd. 24; Th. 31, 15; Gen. 485 : Mt. Bos. 19, 21 : Bt. 5, 3; Fox 12, 12 : Ælfc. Gr. 25; Som. 26, 48. Ic ðæs folces beó hyrde I am the people's pastor, Cd. 106; Th. 139, 24; Gen. 2314. Ic beó gearo sóna I shall be soon ready, Beo. Th. 3655; B. 1825 : Exon. 71 a; Th. 264, 17; Jul. 365 : Andr. Kmbl. 144; An. 72. Ic beó hál I shall be safe, Mt. Bos. 9, 21 : Mk. Bos. 5, 28 : Ex. 3, 12. Ðonne ic stille beóm when I am still, Exon. 102 b; Th. 387, 5; Rä. 4, 74 : 72 a; Th. 268,,26; Jul. 438 : Mt. Lind. Rush. Stv. 9, 21. Ðú ána bist eallra déma thou alone art judge of all, Hy. 8, 38; Hy. Grn. ii. 291, 38 : Bt. Met. Fox 24, 53; Met. 24, 27 : Exon. 8 b; Th. 4, 24; Cri. 57 : Cd. 26; Th. 34, 16; Gen. 538 : Bd. 5, 19; S. 640, 43 : Mk. Lind. War. 14, 70 : Lk. Lind. Rush. War. 1, 76. Ðú yrre byst tu terribilis es, Ps. Th. 75, 5 : 101, 24 : Lk. Bos. 1, 76 : Deut. 23, 22. Hiora birhtu ne biþ to gesettane their brightness is not to be compared, Bt. Met. Fox 6, 11; Met. 6, 6. Biþ ealles leás he will be void of all, Cd. 217; Th. 276, 1; Sat. 182 : 109; Th. 144, 19; Gen. 2392 : Beo. Th. 604; B. 299 : Ps. Th. 118, 142 : Andr. Kmbl. 3383; An. 1695 : Mt. Bos. 5, 19, 22, 37 : Ors. 1, 1; Bos. 20, 18 : Bt. 37, 3;

Fox 190, 15. Fela biþ many there are, Exon. 78 a; Th. 293,14; Crä. 1 : 26 a; Th. 76, 5; Cri. 1235. Ne byþ lang it shall not be long, Elen. Grm. 433 : Beo. Th. 3529; B. 1762. Sélre biþ æ-acute;ghwám it is better for every one, Andr. Kmbl. 640; An. 320 : Ps. Th. 111, 9 : Beo. Th. 2009; B. 1002 : Mt. Bos. 5, 14, 19, 21, 22. Yldo beóþ on eorþan æ-acute;ghwæs cræftig age is on earth powerful of everything, Salm. Kmbl. 583; Sal. 291 : Exon. 36 b; Th. 118, 27; Gú. 246. Ðæ-acute;r wit tú beóþ where we two are, Exon.125 a; Th. 480, 21; Rä. 64, 5 : Beo. Th. 3681; B. 1838 : Cd. 133; Th. 168, 20; Gen. 2785 : Hy. 7, 88; Hy. Grn. ii. 289, 88 : Ors. 1, 1; Bos. 20, 21 : Bd. 4, 16; S. 585, 2 : Bt. 10; Fox 30, 14 : Nicod. 17; Thw. 8, 23 : Mt. Rush. Stv. 26, 31. Beó ðú sunum mínum gedéfe be thou gentle to my sons, Beo. Th. 2457; B. 1226 : Andr. Kmbl. 428; An. 214 : Exon. 81 a; Th. 305, 18; Fä. 90 : Cd. 229; Th. 310, 25; Sat. 733 : Jn. Bos. 3, 2. Ne beóþ ge tó forhte be not ye too terrified, Andr. Kmbl. 3216; An. 1611 : Ps. Th. 104, 4. Ne beó ic gescynded non confundar, Ps. Th. 118, 6. Beón ða oferhydegan ealle gescende confundantur superbi, Ps. Th. 118, 78 : 148, 12. [Orm. beon; pres. beo, best, beoþ, beþ; subj. beo, be, ben : Laym. beon; pres. beo, beost, bist, beoþ, beþ, biþ, biðe; subj. beo : O. Sax. bium, bist : O. Frs. bem, bim, ben, bin : Dut. ben : O. Dut. bem : Ger. M. H. Ger. bin : O. H. Ger. pim : Slav. byti : Zend b&u-long; : Sansk. bh&u-long;, bhav&a-long;mi.] v. eom I am, wesan to be.

beón bees, Ps. Spl. 117, 12 : L. R. S. 5; Th. i. 434, 35. v. beó.

beón, beónn commanded, assembled; p. of bannan.

beón-breád bee-bread, Ps. Spl. 18, 11. v. beó-breád.

beón-broþ, es; n. Perhaps mead, a drink of water and honey mingled and boiled together; melicratum, L. M. 2, 24; Lchdm. ii. 216, 12.

beónde being, Cot. 77; part. of beón.

be ongewyrhtum freely; gratis, Ps. Spl. C. 34, 8.

BEÓR, es; m. I. BEER, nourishing or strong drink; cerevisia, sicera. Beer, made from malted barley, was the favourite drink of the Anglo-Saxons. In their drinking parties, they pledged each other in large cups, round at the bottom, which must be emptied before they could be laid down, hence perhaps the name of a tumbler. We are speaking of the earliest times, for beer is mentioned in Beowulf :-- Gebeótedon beóre druncne oret-mecgas, ðæt hie in beór-sele bídan woldon Grendles gúðe the sons of conflict, drunk with beer, promised that they would await in the beer-hall the attack of Grendel, Beo. Th. 965; B. 480. Æt beóre at the beer, 4088; B. 2041. &hand; Beer was the common drink of the Anglo-Saxons, hence a convivial party was called Gebeórscipe, q. v : a place of entertainment, beórsele a beer-hall, or beórtún a beerenclosure. Hence also the other compounds, as beór-scealc a beer-server, beór-setl a beer-bench or SETTLE, and beór-þegu a beer-serving. The following remark seems to be as applicable to the Anglo-Saxons as to the Icelanders, - Öl heitir með mönnum, en með Ásum bjór ale is called, by men and by gods, BEER, Alvismál. - Beóre druncen drunk with beer, Beo. Th. 1066; B. 531 : Exon. 72 b; Th. 271, 22; Jul. 486. He ne drincþ wín ne beór vinum et siceram non bibet, Lk. Bos. 1, 15 : Deut. 14, 26. Ðæt mon geselle twelf seoxtres beóras that they give twelve sesters of beer, Th. Diplm. A. D. 901-909; 158, 22. II. a beverage made of honey and water, mead; metheglin, hydromeli, &i-short;tis, n. = &upsilon-tonos;δρ&omicron-tonos;μελι, ydromellum, mulsum :-- Beór ydromellum, Ælfc. Gl. 32; Som. 61, 114; Wrt. Voc. 27, 43. Beór mulsum, Ælfc. Gl. 32; Som. 61, 118; Wrt. Voc. 27, 46. [Plat. beer, n : Frs. biar, n : Dut. Ger. bier, n : Icel. bjór, bjórr, m : O. H. Ger. pier, n : Sansk. p&a-long; to drink.] DER. beór-hyrde, -scealc, -scipe, -sele, -setl, -þegu, -tún : gebeór, -scípe.

beora, an; m. A grove; lucus vel nemus, Ælfc. Gl. 110; Som. 79, 39; Wrt. Voc. 59, 11. v. bearo.

beoran to bear :-- Ic sceal beoran I shall bear, Cd. 216; Th. 274, 22; Sat. 158 : 217; Th. 277, 17; Sat. 206. v. beran.

beorc, e; f. I. a birch-tree; betula. v. birce, byrc. II. the Anglo-Saxon Rune &b-rune; = b, the name of which letter in Anglo-Saxon is beorc a birch-tree, hence this Rune not only stands for the letter b, but for beorc a birch-tree, as, - &b-rune; byþ blæ-acute;da leás a birch-tree is void of fruit, Hick. Thes. i. 135; Runic pm. 18; Kmbl. 342, 27.

BEORCAN, ic beorce, he byrcþ; p. bearc, pl. burcon; pp. borcen [Icel. barki, m. guttur]. I. to make a sharp explosive sound; latratum vel sonum edere. v. gebeorc. II. to BARK; latrare :-- Ða dumban húndas ne mágon beorcan. We sceolon beorcan and bodigan ðám læ-acute;wedum dumb dogs cannot bark. We ought to bark and preach to the laymen, L. Ælfc. C. 23; Th. ii. 350, 34. Ic hwílum beorce swá húnd I sometimes bark as a dog, Exon. 106 b; Th. 406, 16; Rä. 25, 2. Húndbyrcþ canis latrat, Ælfc. Gr. 22; Som. 24, 8. Ne mæg he fram húndum beón borcen he may not be barked at by dogs, Herb. 67, 2; Lchdm. i. 170, 17. [O.Nrs. berkja.] DER. gebeorc, borcian.

beorcen birchen; tiliaceus [Kil. bercken]. v. bircen.

Beordan íg, e; f. [íg an island, beordan = bridan = bridum with the young of birds] BARDNEY in Lincolnshire; cœnobii locus in agro Lincolniensi, Som.

beorende bringing forth; part. of beoran.

beorg, beorh, biorg, biorh; gen. beorges; dat. beorge; pl. nom. acc. beorgas; gen. beorga; dat. beorgum; m. I. a hill, mountain; collis, mons :-- On Sýne beorg on Sion's hill, Exon. 20 b; Th. 54, 29; Cri. 876. Óþ ða beorgas ðe man hæ-acute;t Alpis to the mountains which they call the Alps, Ors. 1, 1; Bos. 18, 44; 16, 17. Æ-acute;lc múnt and beorh byþ genyðerod omnis mons et collis humiliabitur, Lk. Bos. 3, 5. Æt ðæm, beorge ðe man Athlans nemneþ at the mountain which they call Atlas, Ors. 1, 1; Bos. 16, 6. II. a heap, BURROW or barrow, a heap of stones, place of burial; tumulus :-- Worhton mid stánum ánne steápne beorh him ofer congregaverunt super eum acervum magnum lapidum, Jos. 7, 26. Bæd ðæt ge geworhton in bæ-acute;lstede beorh ðone heán he commanded [bade] that you should work the lofty barrow on the place of the funeral pile, Beo. Th. 6186; B. 3097 : 5606; B. 2807 : Exon. 50 a; Th. 173, 26; Gú. 1166 : 119 b; Th. 459, 31; Hö. 8. [Laym. berh&yogh;e : Piers bergh; still used in the dialect of Yorkshire : Plat. barg : O. Sax. berg : O. Frs. berch, birg : Ger. berg : M. H. Ger. berc : O. H. Ger. perac : Goth. bairga-hei a mountainous district : Dan. bjærg, n : Swed. berg, n : O. Nrs. berg, n : derived from beorgan.] DER. ge-beorg, -beorh, heáh-, mund-, sæ-acute;-, sand-, stán-.

beorg, berg a protection, refuge; præsidium, refugium. DER. heáfod beorg, ge-beorg, scúr-beorg : cin-berg.

BEORGAN; ic beorge, ðú byrgst, byrhst, he byrgeþ, byrgþ, byrhþ, pl. beorgaþ; p. ic, he bearg, bearh, ðú burge, pl. burgon; impert. beorg, beorh, pl. beorgaþ, beorge ge; pp. borgen; v. a. I. cum dat. To save, protect, shelter, defend, fortify, spare, preserve; servare, salvare, custodire, tueri, parcere :-- Beorh ðínum feore salva animam tuam, Gen. 19, 17. Woldon feore beorgan they would save their lives, Andr. Kmbl. 3075; An. 1540. Beorh me, Drihten, swá swá man byrhþ ðám æplum on his eágum mid his bræ-acute;wum custodi me, Domine, ut pupillam oculi, Ps. Th. 16, 8. Ðæt se bittra bryne beorgan sceolde æ-acute;fæstum þrím that the bitter burning should spare the pious three, Exon. 53 b; Th. 189, 10; Az. 57. II. dat. of the pers. acc. of the thing or following wið, - To defend, secure, guard against, avoid; defendere, arcere, cavere, vitare :-- Hý him hryre burgon they secured him from fall, Exon. 43 a; Th. 145, 30; Gú. 702 : 55 a; Th. 195, 21; Az. 159. Hý beorgaþ him bealoníþ they guard themselves against baleful malice, 44 b; Th. 150, 19; Gú. 781. Druncen beorg ðé from drunkenness guard thyself, 80 b; Th. 302, 10; Fä. 34. Ðæt preóstas beorgan wið ofer-druncen that priests avoid [over-drinking] drunkenness, L. Edg. C. 57; Th. ii. 256, 13. [Orm. berr&yogh;henn : Plat. bargen : O. Sax. gi-bergan : M. H. Ger. bergen : O. H. Ger. perkan, bergan : Goth. bairgan : Dan. bjerge : Swed. berga : O. Nrs. biarga : Grm. Wrtbch. i. 1507 refers to Grk. φρ&alpha-tonos;γνυμι, φ&alpha-tonos;ργνυμι to hedge round, to secure.] DER. be-beorgan, ge-, ymb-.

beorgan to taste; gustare :-- Fénix of ðám wyll-gespryngum brimcald beorgeþ æt baða gehwylcun the Phoenix tastes ocean-cold [water] from the well-springs at every bath, Exon. 57 b; Th. 205, 9; Ph. 110. v. byrgan.

Beorg-ford, Beorh-ford, es; m. [beorg a hill, ford a ford; collis ad vadum] BURFORD in Oxfordshire :-- Hér Cúþréd, Wæst-Seaxna cining, gefeaht ðý xxii geára his ríces, æt Beorgforda [MS. Beorhforda], wið Æðelbald, Myrcena cing, and hine geflýmde here, in 752, Cuthred, king of the West-Saxons, fought in the twenty-second year of his reign, at Burford, with Æthelbald, king of the Mercians, and conquered him, Chr. 752; Erl. 49, 13.

beorg-hleoþ, es; n. A mountain-brow; montis fastigium :-- Ofer beorghleoða over the mountain-brows, Exon. 114 a; Th. 438, 27; Rä, 58, 2. v. beorh-hliþ.