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FEÓND-GRÁP - FEORH

feónd-gráp, e; f. A hostile grasp; host&i-long;lis arreptio :-- Ðæt ic ánunga eówra leóda willan geworhte, oððe on wæl crunge, feóndgrápum fæst that I alone would work your people's will, or bow in death, fast in hostile grasps, Beo. Th. 1276; B. 636.

feónd-gyld, es; n. Devil-worship, sacrifice to devils, idolatry, an idol; di&a-short;b&o-short;li cultus, diab&o-short;l&i-short;cum sacr&i-short;f&i-short;cium, id&o-long;latria, id&o-long;lum :-- Ðá he on ðam folce feóndgyld gebræc when he destroyed idolatry amongst the people, Ps. Th. 105, 24.

feóndlic; adj. Fiendlike, hostile; host&i-long;lis, host&i-short;cus :-- Feóndlíc host&i-short;cus vel host&i-long;lis, Ælfc. Gl. 84; Som. 73, 95; Wrt. Voc. 49, 3.

feóndlice; adv. Hostilely; host&i-long;l&i-short;ter :-- Hyre þurh yrre ageaf andsware fæder feóndlíce her father in anger gave answer hostilely, Exon. 67 b; Th. 249, 27; Jul. 118.

feónd-ræ-acute;den, e; f. [ræ-acute;den a condition] Fiend-condition, enmity; in&i-short;m&i-long;ci cond&i-short;tio, in&i-short;m&i-long;c&i-short;tia :-- Ic sette feóndræ-acute;dene betweox ðé and ðam wífe in&i-short;m&i-long;c&i-short;tias p&o-long;nam inter te et m&u-short;li&e-short;rem, Gen. 3, 15.

feónd-ræ-acute;s, es; m. A fiendish violence; host&i-long;lis imp&e-short;tus :-- Ic feóndræ-acute;s gefremede, fæ-acute;hþe geworhte I committed fiendish violence, wrought enmity, Cd. 42; Th. 55, 26; Gen. 900.

feónd-sceaða, -scaða, an; m. A fiend-enemy, dire enemy, robber; hostis n&o-short;c&i-long;vus, latro :-- Slóh ðone feóndsceaðan fágum méce she [Judith] slew the dire enemy [Holofernes] with a blood-stained sword, Judth. 10; Thw. 23, 4; Jud. 104. Me to grunde teáh fáh feóndscaða a hostile foe drew me to the ground, Beo. Th. 1112; B. 554. Ic sceal forstolen hreddan, flýman feóndsceaðan I shall rescue the stolen, make the robber flee, Exon. 104 a; Th. 396, 5; Rä. 15, 19.

feónd-scipe, -scype, es; m. Fiendship, enmity; in&i-short;m&i-long;c&i-short;tia, host&i-long;l&i-short;tas :-- Ðæt ys se feóndscipe that is the enmity, Beo. Th. 5991; B. 2999: Exon. 95 a; Th. 354, 60; Reim. 68. For feóndscipe ðæs gemynegodan cyninges propter in&i-short;m&i-long;c&i-short;tias m&e-short;m&o-short;r&a-long;ti r&e-long;gis, Bd. 4, 13; S. 581, 42: Cd. 128; Th. 163, 1; Gen. 2691: Ps. Th. 105, 30. He Ræ-acute;dwaldes feónd-scipe fleáh he fled from the enmity of Rædwald, Bd. 3, 18; S. 545, 40, col. 2: Cd. 29; Th. 38, 21; Gen. 610: Exon. 122 a; Th. 468, 5; Phar. 3: Elen. Kmbl. 711; El. 356. Hí feóndscype ræ-acute;rdon they raised enmity, Exon. 66 a; Th. 243, 22; Jul. 14: Exon. 14 b; Th. 30, 28; Cri. 486. Fleónde Ræ-acute;dwaldes feóndscypas in&i-short;m&i-long;c&i-short;tias Redualdi f&u-short;giens, Bd. 3, 18; S. 545, 38, col. 1.

feónd-seóc; adj. Fiend-sick, demoniac; dæm&o-short;ni&a-short;cus :-- Ðætte seó ylce eorþe mihte to hæ-acute;le feóndseócra manna and óðra untrumnyssa ut ipsa terra ad &a-short;b&i-short;gendos ex obsessis corp&o-short;r&i-short;bus dæm&o-short;nes gr&a-long;tiæ salut&a-long;ris h&a-short;b&e-long;ret effectum, Bd. 3, 11; S. 535, 35.

féónd-seócnes, -ness, e; f. Fiend-sickness, demonology; dæm&o-short;ni&a-short;cus morbus, Som. Ben. Lye.

feóndulf? [feónd a fiend, ulf = wulf a wolf?] A fiend, enemy, rascal, scoundrel; furc&i-short;fer :-- Feóndulf furc&i-short;fer, furca dignus, Glos. Prudent. Recd. 146, 82.

feóng, e; f. Hatred; &o-short;dium, Bd. 3, 11; S. 535, note 20. v. feóung.

feor; adj. Perverse, depraved; pr&a-long;vus :-- Mid feorum lífe by a perverse life, Bd. 5, 13; S. 633, note 33. v. þweor.

FEOR, feorr, fior; comp. fyrr, fyr, fier; sup. fyrrest; adv. I. FAR, at a distance; pr&o-short;cul, longe :-- Ðá wæ-acute;ron ðás wundru feor and wíde gemæ-acute;rsode and gecýðed qu&i-short;bus p&a-short;t&e-short;factis ac diff&a-long;m&a-long;tis longe l&a-long;teque m&i-long;r&a-long;c&u-short;lis, Bd. 3, l0; S. 535, 2: 3, 16; S. 542, 16. Hyra heorte is feor [feorr, Mt. Bos. 15, 8] fram me cor e&o-long;rum longe est a me, Mk. Bos. 7, 6: Bt. Met. Fox 24, 4; Met. 24, 2. Ðá gyt ðá he wæs feor his fæder, he hyne geseah when he was yet far from his father, he saw him, Lk. Bos. 15, 20. Nóht feor úrum mynstre non longe a monast&e-long;rio nostro, Bd. 5, 4; S. 617, 5: Cd. 50; Th. 63, 28; Gen. 1039. Feor and neáh far and near, Exon. 13 b; Th. 24, 25; Cri. 390: Cd. 143; Th. 177, 27; Exod. 1: Beo. Th. 2447; B. 1221: Andr. Kmbl. 1276; An. 638. We witan heonan nóht feor óðer eálond n&o-long;v&i-short;mus ins&u-short;lam &a-short;liam esse non pr&o-short;cul a nostra, Bd. 1, 1; S. 474, 15: Beo. Th. 3615; B. 1805. Feor ðú dydest cúþan míne fram me longe f&e-long;cisti n&o-long;tos meos a me, Ps. Lamb. 87, 9. Hit feor on óðre wísan wæs it was far otherwise; longe &a-short;l&i-short;ter &e-short;rat, Bd. 3, 14; S. 539, 44. II. beyond, moreover; ultra, porro :-- Ge feor hafaþ fæ-acute;hþe gestæ-acute;led and moreover she hath set up a deadly feud, Beo. Th. 2684; B. 1340. [Piers P. Chauc. fer: R. Glouc. Wyc. fer, ferr: Laym. feor, fer, ueor, feorre: Orm. feorr: Plat. feere, fere afar: O. Sax. fer: Frs. fier: O. Frs. fir, fer: Dut. ver, verre: Ger. fern: M. H. Ger. vërre: O. H. Ger. fer: Goth. fairra: Dan. fiern: Swed. fjerran: Icel. fjarri far off: Lat. porro: Grk. π&omicron-tonos;ρρω: Sansk. pra forth, away.] DER. un-feor.

feor, feorr; comp. m. fyrra, firra; f. n. fyrre, firre; adj. Far, distant, remote; longinquus, rem&o-long;tus :-- Feorres folclondes of a far country, Exon. 115 b; Th. 444, 14; Kl. 47. Hér is gefered ofer feorne weg æðelinga sum innan ceastre here a noble is come from a long way off into the city, Andr. Kmbl. 2348; An. 1175: 382; An. 191: 504; An. 252.

feora of souls or beings, Exon. 38 a; Th. 126, 7; Gú. 367: Cd. 161; Th. 202, 7; Exod. 384; gen. pl. of feorh.

feoran; p. feorude To remove afar off; elong&a-long;re :-- Ic feorude elong&a-long;vi, Ps. Spl. C. 54, 7. v. feorran.

feor-búend, es; m. One dwelling far off; pr&o-short;cul hab&i-short;t&a-long;tor :-- Nú gé feorbúend, mínne gehýraþ ánfealdne geþoht now ye far-dwellers, hear my simple thought, Beo. Th. 514; B. 254.

feor-cumen; part. Come from afar; per&e-short;gr&i-long;nus, per&e-short;ger ventus :-- Feorcumen [MS. feorcuman] man a far-come man, a foreigner, L. In. 20; Th. i. 114, 15, note 30, MS. B.

feor-cund, feorr-cund; adj. Come from afar; per&e-short;gr&i-long;nus :-- Gif feorcund mon, oððe fremde, bútan wege geond wudu gorge, and ne hriéme ne horn bláwe, for þeóf he biþ to prófianne, oððe to sleánne oððe to aliésanne if a far-come man, or a stranger, journey through a wood out of the highway, and neither shout nor blow his horn, he is to be held for a thief, either to be slain or redeemed, L. In. 20; Th. i. 114, 15-116, 2.

feor-cýþ, -cýþþ, e; f. A far country; rem&o-long;ta terra :-- Feorcýfle beóþ sélran gesóhte far countries are better [when] sought, Beo. Th. 3681, note; B. 1838.

feord an army, force, expedition, Chr. 1066; Erl. 203, 11: 1140; Erl. 265, 8. v. fyrd.

feordian; p. ode; pp. od To be at war; bellum g&e-short;r&e-short;re :-- Hí feordodan wið Ætlan Húna cininge they were at war with Ætla king of the Huns, Chr. 443: Erl. 11, 35. v. fyrdian.

feording military service, Chr. 675; Erl. 38, 2, note 6. v. fyrding.

feore to, for or with life, Exon. 39 a; Th. 128, 32: Beo. Th. 1161; B. 578; dat. and inst. of feorh.

feores of life, Exon. 30 b; Th. 95, 32; Cri. 1566; gen. of feorh.

feorg life, soul, spirit, Exon. 82 b; Th. 311, 19; Seef. 94: 104 a; Th. 394, 14; Rä. 14, 3. v. feorh.

feorg-bold, es; n. The dwelling of life, the body; &a-short;n&i-short;mæ d&o-short;mus, corpus :-- Hræ-acute;w cólode, fæger feorgbold the corpse grew cold, the fair dwelling of life, Rood Kmbl. 145; Kr. 73.

feorg-bona, an; m. A life-destroyer; v&i-long;tæ interfector :-- He him feorgbona weorþeþ he becomes a life-destroyer to him, Exon. 97 a; Th. 362, 24; Wal. 41. v. feorh-bana.

feorg-gedál, es; n. Life-separation, death; v&i-long;tæ divortium, mors :-- Siððan líc and leomu and ðes lífes gæ-acute;st asundrien somwíst hyra þurh feorg-gedál when body and limbs and this life's spirit sunder their fellowship through death, Exon. 50 a; Th. 172, 29; Gú. 1151. v. feorh-gedál.

FEORH, feorg, fiorh, ferh, fyorh; gen. feores; dat. inst. feore; pl. nom. acc. feorh; gen. feora; dat. inst. feorum; n. m. I. life, soul, spirit; v&i-long;ta, &a-short;n&i-short;ma :-- Næ-acute;niges mannes feorh to lore wearþ no man's life was lost, Bd. 4, 21; S. 590, 23: Beo. Th. 2425; B. 1210: Ps. Th. 106, 4. Nó wæs feorh æðelinges flæ-acute;sce bewunden the prince's soul was not surrounded with flesh, Beo. Th. 4839; B. 2424: Exon. 103 a; Th. 391, 9; Rä. 10, 2. Ðonne him ðæt feorg losaþ when his life perishes, 82 b; Th. 311, 19; Seef. 94. Ne bip him feores wén there will be no hope of his life, L. M. 2, 51; Lchdm. ii. 264, 19: Bd. 5, 3; S. 616, 8: Bt. 14, 3; Fox 46, 27: Exon. 115 b; Th. 445, 4; Dóm. 2: Cd. 162; Th. 203, 15; Exod. 404. Feores aþolian to endure life, Exon. 27 a; Th. 81, 7; Cri. 1320. Feores beræ-acute;dan to deprive of life, Andr. Kmbl. 266; An. 133. Feores getwæ-acute;fan to separate from life, Beo. Th. 2871; B. 1433. Feores geunnan to grant life, L. Eth. ix. 1; Th. i. 340, 8: L. C. E. 2; Th. i. 358, 26: Andr. Kmbl. 358; An. 179. Feores ongildan to give up or sacrifice one's life, Andr. Kmbl. 2204; An. 1103. Feores onsæcan to make an attempt against one's life, Beo. Th. 3889; B. 1942. Feores onsécan to bereave of life, Exon. 75 b; Th. 283, 13; Jul. 679. Feores orwéna hopeless of life, Exon. 87 b; Th. 329, 27; Vy. 40: Andr. Kmbl. 2216; An. 1109. Feores récan to care for life, Byrht. Th. 139, 27; By. 260. Feores scyldig guilty of life, liable in one's life, L. Alf. pol. 4; Th. i. 64, 1: L. Ath. i. 4, 6; Th. i. 202, 3, 12: v. § 1, 4; Th. i. 230, 6: L. Eth. iii. 16; Th. i. 298, 14: v. 30; Th. i. 312, 6: vi. 37; Th. i. 324, 17: L. C. S. 58; Th. i. 408, 4. Feores þolian to forfeit life, L. C. S. 78; Th. i. 420, 10. Feores unnan to grant life, Exon. 68 b; Th. 254, 3; Jul. 191. Feores unwyrðe unworthy of life, 30 b; Th. 95, 27; Cri. 1563. Feores wyrðe worthy of life, L. Ath. iv. 4; Th. i. 224, 3. Ðæt man forgá þýfþe be his feore that a man forego theft by his life, L. Ath. i. 20; Th. i. 210, 3: Exon. 105 b; Th. 401, 28; Rä. 21, 18: Beo. Th. 3690; B. 1843: Ps. Th. 54, 24. Beorh ðínum feore salva &a-short;n&i-short;mam tuam, Gen. 19, 17: Cd. 89; Th. 110, 14; Gen. 1838: Beo. Th. 2590; B. 1293: Byrht. Th. 137, 31; By. 194: Elen. Kmbl. 268; El. 134: Andr. Kmbl. 3075; An. 1540. Á to feore for evermore, Exon. 32 b; Th. 102, 25; Cri. 1678. Æ-acute;fre to feore, Ps. Th. 118, 165: Exon. 111 a; Th. 425, 33; Rä. 41, 65. Áwa to feore, Ps. Th. 51, 8. Lange to feore, Ps. Th. 132, 4. Syððan to feore in æternum, 54, 22: 101, 25: 106, 8. To wíðan feore for ever, Cd. 170; Th. 213, 5; Exod. 547: Exon. 11 a; Th. 15, 3; Cri. 230: Beo. Th. 1871; B. 933: Andr. Kmbl. 211; An. 106: Elen. Kmbl. 421; El. 211: Ps. Th. 71, 17. Hæbbe his feorh let him have his life, L. In. 5; Th. i. 104, 14: L. Ath. v. § 1, 4; Th. i. 230, 7: L. Edg. ii. 7; Th. i. 268, 24: L. C. S. 26; Th. i. 392, 3: Ors. 2, 5; Bos. 48, 23: Chr. 937; Erl. 114, 2; Æðelst. 36. Ymb cyninges feorh sierwian to plot against the king's life, L. Alf. pol. 4; Th. i. 62, 15. Ðú ðín feorh hafast thou hast thy life, Beo. Th. 3703; B. 1849: Cd. 116; Th. 151, 17; Gen. 2510: Andr. Kmbl. 1908; An. 956: Exon. 47 b; Th. 164, 10; Gú. 1009. Ðæ-acute;r he eardaþ ealne wídan feorh where he shall dwell for evermore, 14 a; Th. 27, 31; Cri. 439. He mín feorg freoðaþ he will protect my life, 36 a; Th. 116, 28; Gú. 214: Apstls. Kmbl. 116; Ap. 58. He sylfes feore beágas bohte he has bought rings with his own life, Beo. Th. 6019; B. 3013: Exon. 106 b; Th. 406, 9; Rä. 24, 14. Hí bæ-acute;dan hiora feorum fóddurgeafe p&e-short;t&e-short;rent escas an&i-short;m&a-long;bus suis, Ps. Th. 77, 20: Cd. 184; Th. 229, 32; Dan. 226: Beo. Th. 147; B. 73. Freónda feorum with the lives of friends, Beo. Th. 2616; B. 1306. II. a living being, person; h&o-short;mo, pers&o-long;na :-- Ða yldestan Chus and Cham hátene wæ-acute;ron, fulfreólíce feorh, frumbearn Chames the eldest were called Cush and Canaan, most liberal beings, Ham's firstborn, Cd. 79; Th. 97, 25; Gen. 1618. Feónda feorh feóllon þicce the bodies of the foes fell thickly, 95; Th. 124, 19; Gen. 2065. Feora fæsl offspring of the living, 67; Th. 80, 17; Gen. 1330: 67; Th. 81, 9; Gen. 1342: 161; Th. 200, 23; Exod. 361: 161; Th. 202, 7; Exod. 384. Ðæt is sárlíc ðæt swá fæger feorh sceolan ágan þýstra ealdor it is grievous that the prince of darkness should own such beautiful beings, Bd. 2, 1; S. 501, 15. [O. Sax. ferah, ferh, n. life, soul: Ger. ferch, n. v&i-long;ta, sanguis: M. H. Ger. vërch, n. life: O. H. Ger. fërah, ferh, n. &a-short;n&i-short;ma, v&i-long;ta: Goth. fairhwus world: Icel. fjör, n. life.] DER. geógoþ-feorh, geóguþ-, wíde-.